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Meet Frances Perkins, Part II: The First Female U.S. Cabinet Secretary

On Thursday, November 30th, at 7pm at the Adams Academy, Quincy Historical Society is excited to welcome back historical performer Janet Parnes for the second part of her one-woman performance as Frances Perkins, the first woman to become a presidential cabinet member. Janet presented the first part of this performance back in March in honor of Women’s History Month, and is back by popular demand!
In part 2 of this presentation, Parnes will once again step into Frances Perkins’ shoes and escort us through Perkins’ nomination process, her time in FDR’s cabinet during the Great Depression and WWII, her time teaching at Cornell, and the impact that her work had on her personal life. Perkins’ service as United States Secretary of Labor, from 1933 to 1945, was the culmination of a long series of groundbreaking accomplishments that made her one of the most influential Americans of the first half of the twentieth century.
If you were unable to attend the first part of this program, that’s ok! This program is designed to be enjoyed by itself.
There is also a Quincy connection to Frances Perkins’ story. She was a good friend of Molly Dewson, a Quincy native, who was a brilliant reformer and political operative and, like Perkins, a significant member of the New Deal. It was Dewson who organized and led the campaign that resulted in Perkins’ appointment as Secretary of Labor.
The program is free and open to all.
Janet Parnes has previously visited Quincy Historical Society for her performances on the life of Dolly Madison, 19th Century Medicine, and Gilded-Age Etiquette.

Date

Nov 30 2023
Expired!

Time

7:00 pm - 8:30 pm

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Location

Quincy Historical Society & Museum
8 Adams Street, Quincy, Massachusetts
Website
https://quincyhistory.org/
Adams Academy Building

Location 2

Adams Academy Building
8 Adams Street, Quincy, Massachusetts
Category
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